Quick Facts: 

“The energy industry will stagnate without a pipeline of excellent Ph.D. candidates advancing the science of geology through their graduate research. It is critical to support the Graduate Fellowship Fund to help others afford a premier education that will lead them to careers as personally satisfying as mine has been.”

– Dr. Eric S. Pasternack

“The energy industry will stagnate without a pipeline of excellent Ph.D. candidates advancing the science of geology through their graduate research. It is critical to support the Graduate Fellowship Fund to help others afford a premier education that will lead them to careers as personally satisfying as mine has been.”
– Dr. Eric S. Pasternack - See more at: http://peoplesupportingpenn.upenn.edu/schools-and-centers/#3

For the past 35 years, petrophysicist Dr. Eric S. Pasternack, GR’78, has made an annual contribution to the Graduate Fellowship Fund to enable students to pursue their interests in the earth sciences and other disciplines—and use their degrees for research and practical applications. Pasternack, who obtained his Ph.D. in geology from Penn Arts & Sciences, gives back because he understands that graduate students often make financial sacrifices to obtain advanced degrees in fields they love. “Students who want a doctorate in geology are clearly motivated by a genuine desire to make a contribution to science,” he says.

While researching and writing his own dissertation, Pasternack studied mineral luminescence in the laboratory and wrote an extensive amount of code in the programming language FORTRAN to automate data analysis. These were the skills that made him marketable to the oil company ARCO, where he worked for nearly 20 years, both as a scientist defining the properties of rocks and fluids in the earth and as a manager overseeing oil and gas project operations. In 1999, Pasternack launched his own petrophysics consulting business. “I no longer write code in FORTRAN, but I use the physics and geology on a daily basis,” he says.

With energy companies constantly looking for innovations in oil and gas exploration and extraction, Pasternack firmly believes that educated physicists and geologists will be crucial to the industry. “Because there is no financial incentive for the ‘best and brightest’ to pursue a Ph.D. in this field,” he says, “funding their education makes sense for the long-term viability of geology as a discipline.”

For the past 35 years, petrophysicist Dr. Eric S. Pasternack, GR’78, has made an annual contribution to the Graduate Fellowship Fund to enable students to pursue their interests in the earth sciences and other disciplines—and use their degrees for research and practical applications. Pasternack, who obtained his Ph.D. in geology from Penn Arts & Sciences, gives back because he understands that graduate students often make financial sacrifices to obtain advanced degrees in fields they love. “Students who want a doctorate in geology are clearly motivated by a genuine desire to make a contribution to science,” he says.

While researching and writing his own dissertation, Pasternack studied mineral luminescence in the laboratory and wrote an extensive amount of code in the programming language FORTRAN to automate data analysis. These were the skills that made him marketable to the oil company ARCO, where he worked for nearly 20 years, both as a scientist defining the properties of rocks and fluids in the earth and as a manager overseeing oil and gas project operations. In 1999, Pasternack launched his own petrophysics consulting business. “I no longer write code in FORTRAN, but I use the physics and geology on a daily basis,” he says.

With energy companies constantly looking for innovations in oil and gas exploration and extraction, Pasternack firmly believes that educated physicists and geologists will be crucial to the industry. “Because there is no financial incentive for the ‘best and brightest’ to pursue a Ph.D. in this field,” he says, “funding their education makes sense for the long-term viability of geology as a discipline.”

- See more at: http://peoplesupportingpenn.upenn.edu/schools-and-centers/#3